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Gettysburg Address - Historical Vintage Document Wall Decor Print - 24" x 18"

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Virginia Plan Replica Print
Virginia Plan Replica PrintVirginia Plan Replica PrintBack Of Sign - 24" x 18" with wall spacer for stabilityMounting Clip AttachedSign Thickness - 1/4"
Price: $56.00
Part #: 2418VP-GETTYSBURG
Width: 18"
Depth: .25"
Height: 24"
  • 24" x 18" replica print of the original Gettysburg Address on .25" thick black Sintra material.
  • Easy to mount and display on any flat surface!
  • Great for any history buff, school, library or place of learning!
  • Made to Order

Perhaps the most famous battle of the Civil War took place at Gettysburg, PA, July 1 to July 3, 1863.
At the end of the battle, the Union's Army of the Potomac had successfully repelled the second invasion of the
North by the Confederacy's Army of Northern Virginia. Several months later, President Lincoln went to Gettysburg to speak at
the dedication of the cemetery for the Union war dead. Speaking of a "new birth of freedom,"
he delivered one of the most memorable speeches in U.S. history.

At the end of the Battle of Gettysburg, more than 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers were wounded, missing, or dead. Many of those who died were laid in makeshift graves along the battlefield. Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin commissioned David Wills, an attorney, to purchase land for a proper burial site for the deceased Union soldiers. Wills acquired 17 acres for the cemetery, which was planned and designed by landscape architect William Saunders.

The cemetery was dedicated on November 19, 1863. The main speaker for the event was Edward Everett, one of the nation’s foremost orators. President Lincoln was also invited to speak “as Chief Executive of the nation, formally [to] set apart these grounds to their sacred use by a few appropriate remarks.” At the ceremony, Everett spoke for more than 2 hours; Lincoln spoke for 2 minutes.

President Lincoln had given his brief speech a lot of thought. He saw meaning in the fact that the Union victory at Gettysburg coincided with the nation’s birthday; but rather than focus on the specific battle in his remarks, he wanted to present a broad statement about the larger significance of the war. He invoked the Declaration of Independence, and its principles of liberty and equality, and he spoke of “a new birth of freedom” for the nation. In his brief address, he continued to reshape the aims of the war for the American people—transforming it from a war for Union to a war for Union and freedom. Although Lincoln expressed disappointment in the speech initially, it has come to be regarded as one of the most elegant and eloquent speeches in U.S. history.

 

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