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Declaration of Independence - Historical Vintage Document Wall Decor Print - 24" x 18"

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Price: $56.00
Part #: 2418VP-DECLARATION
Width: 18"
Depth: .25"
Height: 24"
  • 24" x 18" replica print of the original print on .25" thick black Sintra material.
  • Easy to mount and display on any flat surface!
  • Great for any history buff, school, library or place of learning!
  • Made to Order

The Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.
It was engrossed on parchment and on August 2, 1776, delegates began signing it.

Under the supervision of the Jefferson committee, the approved Declaration was printed on July 5th and a copy was attached to the "rough journal of the Continental Congress for July 4th." These printed copies, bearing only the names of John Hancock, President, and Charles Thomson, secretary, were distributed to state assemblies, conventions, committees of safety, and commanding officers of the Continental troops.

On July 19th, Congress ordered that the Declaration be engrossed on parchment with a new title, "the unanimous declaration of the thirteen united states of America," and "that the same, when engrossed, be signed by every member of Congress." Engrossing is the process of copying an official document in a large hand. The engrosser of the Declaration was probably Timothy Matlock, an assistant to Charles Thomson, secretary to the Congress.

On August 2nd John Hancock, the President of the Congress, signed the engrossed copy with a bold signature. The other delegates, following custom, signed beginning at the right with the signatures arranged by states from northernmost New Hampshire to southernmost Georgia. Although all delegates were not present on August 2nd, 56 delegates eventually signed the document. Late signers were Elbridge Gerry, Oliver Wolcott, Lewis Morris, Thomas McKean, and Matthew Thornton, who was unable to place his signature with the other New Hampshire delegates due to a lack of space. Some delegates, including Robert R. Livingston of New York, a member of the drafting committee, never signed the Declaration.

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